El resplandor de la selva invisible: Hacia una fenomenología de las significaciones invistas

Translated title of the contribution: The glow of the invisible forest: Towards a phenomenology of unseen significance

Julián García Labrador, Stéphane Vinolo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Authors analyzing Amerindian graphism have noted, on several occasions, the important role played by the category of the invisible. Nonetheless, and paradoxically, this invisible is not given as a lack of visibility since it is not introduced as a denial of visibility but rather, on the contrary, as its excess. It is due to our incapacity to receive the wholeness of what is given, that certain things remain invisible. This work shows that Jean-Luc Marion’s phenomenology of givenness allows us to consider invisibility due to the excess of visibility, through the category of “saturated phenomena” applied to the analysis of the idol and the icon. Using the phenomenological model of anamorphosis, it is demonstrated that invisibility due to excess, makes us rethink the relationship between the Subject and what appears, and the modal-ity of the invisible, which is not represented but signified. The Subject must abandon its transcendental primacy and make itself secondary with regards the phenomenon, in order to receive the invisible significance that is given behind the representative poorness of the Amazonian art. As such, from different perspectives, both Amazon studies and phenomenology allow us to overcome the end of metaphysics.

Translated title of the contributionThe glow of the invisible forest: Towards a phenomenology of unseen significance
Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)125-144
Number of pages20
JournalAntipoda
Volume2018
Issue number33
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2018

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
M.A.K. is funded by an NIHR Research Professorship and receives funding from the Sir Jules Thorn Award for Biomedical Research, Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital Charity (GOSHCC) and Rosetrees Trust. M.A.K., K.E.B., L.A., D.S., A.N., N.T. and E.M. are supported by the NIHR GOSH BRC. K.M.G. received funding from Temple Street Foundation. L.A. is funded by the Swiss National Foundation. E.M. received funding from the Rosetrees Trust (CD-A53), and the Great Ormond Street Hospital Children’s Charity. A.S.J. is funded by NIHR Bioresource for Rare Diseases. S.A.I. and M.H. are supported by the NINDS Intramural program. K.P.B. is PI of the Movement disorders centre (MDC) at UCL, Institute of Neurology which has been funded by the BRC. He has grant support by EU Horizon 2020. M.E.D-H. has clinical training grant through Tourette Association of America, but the research is unrelated to KMT2B. T.L. received funding from Health Research Board, Ireland and Michael J Fox. Foundation. K.A.M. receives funding from the NIH (award number K23NS101096-01A1). N.S. receives funding from the NIH (award number NS 087997 0). D.D. was supported by KIM MUSE Biomarkers and Therapy study grant during this work. B.B.A.d.V. financially supported by grants from the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (912-12-109). J.F. is funded by the Rady Children’s Institute for Genomic Medicine. F.L.R. is funded by Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre. The DDD study presents independent research commissioned by the Health Innovation Challenge Fund [grant number HICF-1009-003], a parallel funding partnership between the Wellcome Trust and the Department of Health, and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute [grant number WT098051]. This research

Funding Information:
We thank all our patients and their families for taking part in this study. This research was supported by the NIHR Great Ormond Street Hospital Biomedical Research Centre. We also acknowledge support from the UK Department of Health via the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) comprehensive Biomedical Research Centre award to Guy’s and St. Thomas’ National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust in partnership with King’s College London. The research team acknowledges the support of the National Institute for Health Research, through the Comprehensive Clinical Research Network. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR, Department of Health or Wellcome Trust. Sequencing for Patient 37 was provided by the University of Washington Center for Mendelian Genomics (UW-CMG) and was funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute grant HG006493 to Drs Debbie Nickerson, Michael Bamshad, and Suzanne Leal.

Funding Information:
We thank all our patients and their families for taking part in this study. This research was supported by the NIHR Great Ormond Street Hospital Biomedical Research Centre. We also acknowledge support from the UK Department of Health via the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) comprehensive Biomedical Research Centre award to Guy's and St. Thomas' National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust in partnership with King's College London. The research team acknowledges the support of the National Institute for Health Research, through the Comprehensive Clinical Research Network. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR, Department of Health or Wellcome Trust. Sequencing for Patient 37 was provided by the University of Washington Center for Mendelian Genomics (UW-CMG) and was funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute grant HG006493 to Drs Debbie Nickerson, Michael Bamshad, and Suzanne Leal. M.A.K. is funded by an NIHR Research Professorship and receives funding from the Sir Jules Thorn Award for Biomedical Research, Great Ormond Street Children's Hospital Charity (GOSHCC) and Rosetrees Trust. M.A.K., K.E.B., L.A., D.S., A.N., N.T. and E.M. are supported by the NIHR GOSH BRC. K.M.G. received funding from Temple Street Foundation. L.A. is funded by the Swiss National Foundation. E.M. received funding from the Rosetrees Trust (CD-A53), and the Great Ormond Street Hospital Children's Charity. A.S.J. is funded by NIHR Bioresource for Rare Diseases. S.A.I. and M.H. are supported by the NINDS Intramural program. K.P.B. is PI of the Movement disorders centre (MDC) at UCL, Institute of Neurology which has been funded by the BRC. He has grant support by EU Horizon 2020. M.E.D-H. has clinical training grant through Tourette Association of America, but the research is unrelated to KMT2B. T.L. received funding from Health Research Board, Ireland and Michael J Fox. Foundation. K.A.M. receives funding from the NIH (award number K23NS101096-01A1). N.S. receives funding from the NIH (award number NS 087997 0). D.D. was supported by KIM MUSE Biomarkers and Therapy study grant during this work. B.B.A.d.V. financially supported by grants from the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (912-12-109). J.F. is funded by the Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine. F.L.R. is funded by Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre. The DDD study presents independent research commissioned by the Health Innovation Challenge Fund [grant number HICF-1009-003], a parallel funding partnership between the Wellcome Trust and the Department of Health, and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute [grant number WT098051]. This research was made possible through access to the data and findings generated by the 100 000 Genomes Project (Patient 34). The 100 000 Genomes Project is managed by Genomics England Limited (a wholly owned company of the Department of Health). The 100 000 Genomes Project is funded by the National Institute for Health Research and NHS England. The Wellcome Trust, Cancer Research UK and the Medical Research Council have also funded research infrastructure. The 100 000 Genomes Project uses data provided by patients and collected by the National Health Service as part of their care and support. Research reported in this manuscript was supported by the NIH Common Fund, through the Office of Strategic Coordination/Office of the NIH Director to the Undiagnosed Disease Network (UDN) and the NIH Undiagnosed Disease Program (Award numbers: U01HG007690 and U01HG007703). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Funding Information:
was made possible through access to the data and findings generated by the 100 000 Genomes Project (Patient 34). The 100 000 Genomes Project is managed by Genomics England Limited (a wholly owned company of the Department of Health). The 100 000 Genomes Project is funded by the National Institute for Health Research and NHS England. The Wellcome Trust, Cancer Research UK and the Medical Research Council have also funded research infrastructure. The 100 000 Genomes Project uses data provided by patients and collected by the National Health Service as part of their care and support. Research reported in this manuscript was supported by the NIH Common Fund, through the Office of Strategic Coordination/Office of the NIH Director to the Undiagnosed Disease Network (UDN) and the NIH Undiagnosed Disease Program (Award numbers: U01HG007690 and U01HG007703). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018, Universidad de los Andes, Bogota Colombia. All rights reserved.

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