A study of biodiversity and water quality by analysing aquatic macroinvertebrates in the pasochoa wildlife refuge, Ecuador

F. Bersosa, V. Calderón, R. Sanchez, M. Sarzosa, B. Mátyás

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Province of Pichincha, Ecuador is home to the calderas and flanks of the Pasochoa volcano, where the Pasochoa Wildlife Refuge (RVSP for its Spanish acronym) is located. This area is one of the few places that conserves some of the most important remnants of the Andean native forest. This study seeks to determine the biodiversity and water quality of the Pasochoa Wildlife Refuge by studying its aquatic macroinvertebrates. The data for this work were obtained from five sampling points located between the caldera and outside the RVSP. This effort was carried out along the stream that descends from the Pasochoa volcano at an altitude of 3014 meters above sea level (masl) to 2667 masl. Water samples were also obtained for a physical-chemical analysis. Preliminarily, a total of 6149 invertebrates, corresponding to 3 phyla, 10 orders and 36 families, were captured as indicators of water quality. The most abundant phylum was Arthropoda, with 6130 individuals. Additionally, specimens of annelids and mollusks were recorded. The greatest abundance was recorded for the families of Elmidae (Coleoptera) and Leptoceridae (Trichoptera), with 2059 and 1071 individuals, respectively. According to the families that indicate water quality, it fluctuates between very good to regular in PMM-01, which is an area with anthropic influence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4949-4956
Number of pages8
JournalApplied Ecology and Environmental Research
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Abundance
  • Environmental indicators
  • Environmental qualitys
  • Species richness
  • Water quality

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